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Exigent Med Group, LLC to Launch SelfPayMD in September


Miami, FL (PRWEB) July 26, 2014

Exigent Med Group, LLC announced the scheduled September launch of SelfPayMD (SPMD), the first of five medical offices in Miami-Dade dedicated to providing deeply-discounted, “direct-access” to board certified Primary Care Physicians (PCP) to self-pay patients. Absolutely no health insurance will be accepted.

Even the best health insurance companies pay MDs only 20% to 25% of billed amount, while the latter shoulders rising overhead and labor-intensive collection efforts.“We do not accept any type of health insurance,” said Dr. Arroyave, MD, CEO. “Credit/debit card payments eliminate paperwork, billing and collection staff, and the huge savings allow $ 75 visits for the uninsured.”

As a direct result of diminishing reimbursements and rising overhead costs (long before the Affordable Care Act, aka: ObamaCare), some PCPs refused government or private insurance, opting for a 100% direct- access practice model. Currently in the US, direct-access accounts for 4%-6% of primary care medical practices – and growing. Even in England, with decades of socialized medicine, direct-pay is growing at 5% per year.

“Understanding our market of self-pay patients, we don’t stop there; we also navigate them (as needed) to a network of independent medical and surgical specialists, labs, imaging centers and even SurgiCenters offering deep discounts to direct-access patients – a free service to our patients. Patients are seen by appointments and walk-ins. “Membership is optional, at only $ 250 per year for individuals,” said Arroyave. “We will also offer special membership pricing to families and employers with less than 50 employees.”

Although ObamaCare provides health insurance for the poor, many in the middle-middle class who don’t qualify for subsidies will be unable to afford health insurance. Then there are those who will game the system, providing false information to get subsidies, and some young people who will opt for the small penalty rather than pay high premiums. Further, those with mandatory high deductibles of $ 5K – $ 9K may shop around for low, “out-of-pocket” prices. The government estimates that about 4 million people, or 1.2% of the population, will wind up paying the penalty tax rather than purchase health insurance. Healthcare experts believe that number is way underestimated, as there will be millions flying under the radar – without insurance.

Increased insurance rolls, a shortage of physicians, and more government control of healthcare access will result in long wait-times to be seen by a PCP. ObamaCare will add 32 million patients to the insurance rolls, and, by the government’s own admission, they expect a shortage of 52,000 PCPs by 2020. Even with the full implementation, they also predict that over 30 million people will remain uninsured (you read correctly)! This will lead to congestion.

Today in Massachusetts, with its mini-ObamaCare, the wait time to see a PCP is about two months; and, if patient care at VA Hospitals is an indication of things to come from more government involvement in health care, long appointment wait-times will be the norm. “Thus, many insured patients who want to be seen quickly will come to SPMD, even if they have to pay a small out-of-pocket fee,” said Chris Merlano, a senior executive with SPMD.

Corporate America is taking notice of direct-pay primary care models. “People will always need PCPs, regardless of recession or inflation. This is an opportunity for serious investors,” said Larry Chilson, a senior executive with DevelopMED since 2006.

For more information please contact:

Exigent Med Group, LLC

Marketing |Public Affairs | Communications

444 Brickell Avenue, Suite 51-121 | Miami, FL 33131| O 305.252.7921

contact(at)selfpaymd(dot)com | http://www.SelfPayMD.com







The Old Reader launches Premium version for users with more than 100 feeds: $3 per month or $30 per year

94788580 520x245 The Old Reader launches Premium version for users with more than 100 feeds: $ 3 per month or $ 30 per year

The Old Reader, a popular RSS service and alternative to Google Reader, today announced a Premium version, which is required for users with more than 100 feeds. The Old Reader Premium will cost $ 3 per month or $ 30 per year, although there is a two-week promotional price (up to 5,000 accounts) of $ 2 per month or $ 20 per year for a minimum of the next two years.

The company says 90 percent of its users can continue using the free service, but the remaining 10 percent will be asked to subsidize them. All functionality will remain available to free accounts, but if you have more than 100 feeds, you’ll be forced to upgrade (there’s a two-week trial period you might want to check out if you’re in this group).

If you do end up upgrading, here are the features you can expect:

  • Full-text search.
  • Faster feed refresh times.
  • Up to 500 Subscriptions.
  • 6 months of post storage.
  • Instapaper and Readability integration.
  • Early access to new features.

The goal is naturally to build a business model for the RSS reader. A service at such scale can’t be maintained for free forever:

Our next goal is to ensure the long term financial viability of The Old Reader. Hosting, development, and support are not inexpensive and while it’s never been our goal to get rich off of this application, long term sustainability and growth will require revenue. So we explored several models for generating revenues including a premium offering and advertising. In the end, we’d like to avoid advertising as we feel it’s too invasive and runs counter to our strong belief in the open web.

If you want to subscribe to more than 100 feeds without paying for premium version, we recommend InoReader and Feedly.

See also – The Old Reader team pulls a 180, announces the RSS reader may remain open to the public and The Old Reader lives: Site will stay open to the public thanks to an unnamed ‘corporate entity’ in the US

Top Image Credit: Thinkstock


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