Tag Archives: security

To Permit Medicare Beneficiaries to Enroll with Qualified Provider- Sponsored Organizations Under Title XVIII of the Social Security ACT, and for Other Purposes. (Paperback) – Common

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To permit medicare beneficiaries to enroll with qualified provider- sponsored organizations under title XVIII of the Social Security Act, and for other purposes.

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To Amend Title XVIII of the Social Security ACT to Provide Protections for Medicare Beneficiaries Who Enroll in Medicare Managed Care Plans. (Paperback) – Common

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To amend title XVIII of the Social Security Act to provide protections for Medicare beneficiaries who enroll in Medicare managed care plans. Reviews

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DrawQuest closes down after suffering a security breach

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DrawQuest, the iPad that lets users channel their creativity through drawing, has been living on its last legs since early this year and now it has closed down with immediate effect after suffering a security breach. Founder Chris Poole, who also started 4Chan, first announced the closure of DrawQuest in January but there was later optimism that it would be able to continue running for users for “as long as possible,” despite its team all moving to new work. A hack on its Amazon-hosted servers has proved to be the final nail in its coffin, however. A blog post explains that it is unclear exactly what information…

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The NSA reportedly spied right into the heart of ‘security threat’ Huawei

Huawei
The New York Times and German newspaper Spiegel Online have reported the existence of a document that purports to show the US government spying on Chinese tech company Huawei, the world’s second largest supplier of networking products, since at least 2009. The revelation is laced with irony because Huawei has long been labelled a national security risk by US politicians. Alongside fellow Chinese firm ZTE, Huawei has been the subject of multiple reports over alleged relationships with China’s army, and questions of whether its networking products could leave US organizations open to hacking from China if they were deployed on US soil. The answer seems…

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Google acquires cyber security startup Spider.io to help combat online advertising fraud

180390471 520x245 Google acquires cyber security startup Spider.io to help combat online advertising fraud

Google today announced that it has acquired Spider.io, a London-based cyber security firm that combats online advertising fraud. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, although Google said it would be using the startup’s detection system to improve its display and video ad services.

“By including Spider.io’s fraud fighting expertise in our products, we can scale our efforts to weed out bad actors and improve the entire digital ecosystem,” Neal Mohan, Google’s vice president for display advertising said.

Online ad fraud is a huge problem, whereby advertizers pay for exposure and clicks on the Web that are actually powered by bots, networks of hijacked devices and other non-human traffic. Therefore, advertizers are paying large sums of money for impressions that won’t result in new customers.

With Spider.io, Google hopes to improve the accuracy of the information it gives advertizers, resulting in a “a clearer, cleaner picture of what campaigns and media are truly delivering strong results.” We’ll have to wait and see.

Blog Post (Via Recode)

Image Credit: PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images


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GoDaddy changing security policy after infamous social engineering attack on @N

lock 520x245 GoDaddy changing security policy after infamous social engineering attack on @N

Naoki Hiroshima’s scary tale of losing his single-character Twitter handle has captivated the internet over the last few days. First, we heard the story of how Naoki was held ransom for the rare handle, then GoDaddy admitted it was partially responsible for giving out details that lead to the compromise.

Today, GoDaddy said on Twitter that it is changing its security policies to help protect against similar attacks of social engineering in the future:

The change may appear small on the surface, but should help prevent a repeat of the same story. It would be extremely hard for an attacker to gain 8 digits of a credit card (unless the whole card was stolen) and by locking the account after 3 attempts the company is protecting itself from attackers that would just hang up the phone and try again with a new representative.

Unfortunately, Naoki still hasn’t received his Twitter account back with the handle now in the grips of yet another squatter. The story isn’t quite over yet.

GoDaddy Updates Its User Protection Policies In Wake Of Infamous Twitter Account Extortion [Techcrunch]

Image via Shutterstock


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Dropbox says its outage is due to a ‘routine internal maintenance’ issue, denies any security breach

dropbox ilamont flickr 520x245 Dropbox says its outage is due to a ‘routine internal maintenance’ issue, denies any security breach

Cloud storage service Dropbox is experiencing intermittent outages this evening. Around 6:00pm PST, accessing the service either by Web or through its mobile apps not possible. The API has also apparently stopped working as of 5:45 PST, as Dave Winer noted.

A company spokesperson issued a statement saying: “We are aware of an issue currently affecting the Dropbox site. We have identified the cause, which was the result of an issue that arose during routine internal maintenance, and are working to fix this as soon as possible. We apologize for any inconvenience.”

Update: Dropbox has fixed the outage and confirmed that the leaked user info is a hoax:

The original story is below.

Screen Shot 2014 01 10 at 6.05.46 PM 730x572 Dropbox says its outage is due to a ‘routine internal maintenance’ issue, denies any security breach

Around the same time, a Twitter account allegedly belonging to the hacking group 1775Sec claimed responsibility for the downtime and for compromising Dropbox’s website.

The account has more Tweets that talk about how the hackers did so to expose vulnerabilities in Dropbox’s website. Additionally, it claimed to have access to a database and threatened to leak it if fixes weren’t made. It’s interesting to note that this weekend marks the one year anniversary of the death of Internet activist and computer programmer Aaron Swartz.

Later, a sample of what is purported to be Dropbox’s database was revealed. A hacker going by the name “Thomas Jefferson” supposedly belonging to 1775Sec claimed responsibility. We have reached out to Dropbox for confirmation on whether these are legitimate users — this could all be a clever ruse.

Update: As many have pointed out in the comments section and on Twitter, the “leak” is a hoax. Our apologies for the error and this post has been updated to reflect this.

When inquiring with Dropbox about whether it had a security breach, the company remained firm in its response and attributed its current outage on a “routine maintenance” issue.


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